Meet Up!

The amazing Raspberry Pi keeps evolving before our eyes. The Pis in the world (which reached 2 million in October 2013) are inspiring hackers young and old, amateur and professional, to put the Pi to work on practical problems. And, wherever Pi users go, Raspberry Pi Geek goes.

The amazing Raspberry Pi keeps evolving before our eyes. The Pis in the world (which reached 2 million in October 2013) are inspiring hackers young and old, amateur and professional, to put the Pi to work on practical problems. And, wherever Pi users go, Raspberry Pi Geek goes.

We bring you some of those practical experiments this month. You'll learn about BrickPi, a product that lets you use your Raspberry Pi as a built-in control center for Lego Mindstorms robots. We'll also show you how to configure your Pi so you can control it using a standard infrared TV remote. We'll employ the Pi on the network as a DHCP/DNS server, and we'll even show you how to control a legacy Nikon film camera with a Raspberry Pi.

If you're looking for help with programming for the Pi environment, we introduce you to the Pygame gaming module for Python developers. We bring your another tutorial on the super-friendly Scratch programming language, and we show you how to extend the Pi by adding the capacity to receive input from an analog device.

Elsewhere, we investigate the unlikely phenomenon of Raspberry Pi hosting, and we visit Raspberry Towers in Cambridge, England for a talk with Rasp Pi creators Eben Upton and Gordon Hollingworth.

As we always like to point out – we're not all Pi. This issue also includes other open hardware adventures, such as a strange, but highly entertaining, Arduino project and a look at managing extension boards in Beaglebone.

Try these tricks at home. Or, if your circumstances are a little different and these steps don't apply to your environment, you can still study these stories and learn about techniques that could someday support and inspire your own Raspberry Pi creations. Either way, think of this magazine as your own personal Raspberry Pi meet up – 96 pages of creativity, community, and classic open hardware hacking. Come on in!

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