Pi in the Palace

Welcome to the sixth issue of Raspberry Pi Geek magazine. In case you haven't done the math, six issues for a bimonthly magazine means we're celebrating our one year anniversary! We had a great year, and so did the amazing Raspberry Pi computer. It seems like we were just writing about the 2 millionth Raspberry Pi, and now the Foundation has announced the 3 millionth unit. 

Welcome to the sixth issue of Raspberry Pi Geek magazine. In case you haven't done the math, six issues for a bimonthly magazine means we're celebrating our one year anniversary! We had a great year, and so did the amazing Raspberry Pi computer. It seems like we were just writing about the 2 millionth Raspberry Pi, and now the Foundation has announced the 3 millionth unit. The new compute module (which we talked about last issue) brings the Pi to a new market of industrial uses. New add-ons and accessories appear every month, and a worldwide community of open hardware enthusiasts continues to push the boundary of what one could hope to accomplish with a $35 computer. Considering the official Raspberry Pi launch was only a little more than two years ago, we have already witnessed and chronicled a good portion of its history – and we're just getting started.

With this issue, we're rolling out a News column, where you'll find out about exciting events like the Raspberry Pi's auspicious arrival at Buckingham Palace. We also have a talk with Ben Gray about the amazing MeArm robotic arm, and we test drive the Banana Pi, a system-on-a-board computer modeled on the Raspberry Pi that comes with a dual-core processor and other higher end features.

Inside these pages, we've got lots of the amazing apps and cool projects you've come to expect from Raspberry Pi Geek. We'll show you how to control your Pi from the web with WebIOPi. You'll also find out how to build a 5-volt power supply to run your Pi on battery power. We'll discuss some tools for running an electronic information screen from your Raspberry Pi, and we'll describe how to use your Pi as a tool for managing slide show presentations.

Get your Raspberry Pi and Arduino boards communicating with the SIMPL toolkit, create a Lego vehicle without the expense and limitations of Mindstorms, and use Apple's iBeacons service to create a system for switching on lights whenever you enter a room. We've also got more inspired Scratch programming, and we'll introduce you to an alternative, kid-friendly visual programming tool known as Snap!

Make a sandwich and get your Pi ready – we've got lots of enchantment ahead.

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